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in the basin and technical aspects of energy in the boat and who wrote the whole manuscript to check on the scientific details of it. well, this is an appropriate day for talking about regulation to disaster because less that president obama promised once more to develop the energy sources of the future. republican or democrat decides to develop energy projects, taxpayers had better watch out. governments get in the business of picking winners and losers, which leads to cronyism and wasted taxpayer dollars. this is the question of industrial policy. whether government should support business ventures and new technology that are unable to secure private hunting, government appears to be worse than private market in the records that we have over the past five years. in california in may, mitt romney said, quote, the president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one solar energy company makes it harder for solar technology generally because the scores from the ranch partners in the field suddenly lost their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar comp
] e-mail welcome to this evening in the broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament of two things. one is how this issue of education reform has been a combination of talent that we see in this room and how it has coalesced around this issue of new technologies. that there really is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i'm a great believer that two things matter. one is ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change. it is the driver of history. this includes the coming together of a person with real talent and drive. this is one of them. so again, the fact that you are all here is the greatest. condoleezza rice and i come out of the national security background. when we were youngsters, we used to mess around with iran bomb calculator. and he used to calculate what was known as the circular error probable of the blast effects of nuclear weapons. here we are today, we have traveled a considerable difference. we have traveled a considerable distance. they didn't say al qaeda or iran or north korea, wh
of defense has invested significant time and resources into improving our nation's energy security. energy security is imperative to the success of today's military. which, by the way, uses 93% of the energy that's used by the federal government, which is the largest user of energy in this country. as our current chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general dempsey, has said, without improving our energy security we are not merely standing still as a nation, we are falling behind. let's be clear. energy security is national security. and our military leadership understands this. other countries, including some of our strongest competitors, also understand this and we ignore this fact at our own peril. i saw some of the innovations that the navy has adopted earlier this year when i chaired a hearing for the energy subcommittee on water and power down in norfolk aboard the uss kersarge. the purpose was to highlight the advancements the navy continues to make in harnessing renewable energy resources. up with of those resources i saw is homegrown -- homegrown biofuels. and the navy recently
, energy and the navy signed a memorandum of understanding to invest $170 million each to spur the production of advanced aviation and marine biofuels under the defense production act. this joint memorandum of understanding requires substantial cost sharing from private industry of at least a one-to-one match. the main objective of this memorandum of understanding is to spur the construction or retrofit of commercial scale advanced biofuel refineries. these facilities will produce drop-in advanced biofuels meeting military specifications. they will be located at geographically diverse locations for ready market access and will have no significant impact on the supply of agricultural commodities for the production of food. it's the largest single consumer of fuel in the world, the department of defense uses approximately 120 million barrels of oil each year, spending over $17 billion in fiscal year 2011 on fuel. this dependency on a single source of energy leaves our military's readiness at risk. when the price of oil goes up $1, it costs the navy an additional $30 million, and
five definitions of the 3 #.1 million green jobs that it's counted. energy, energy first efficiency, energy pollution reduction and removal, natural resource conservation, and environmental compliance, education, and training, and public awareness. when i was testifying on capital hill before the house energy and commerce committee, they had a paper cup in front of me. often, it's a bottle of water, but this time it was a bottle of water and paper cup. the cup said architect of the capital on one side and power to save energy on the other side. since this cup fit the definition of education, training, and public awareness, the workers who made it had green jobs. if the cup had just said architect of the capital or just been a plain white cup, then the people who made it would not have had green jobs. when i wrote this book "regulating to disaster" about environmental issues, while i was doing it, i had a green job, and, perhaps, i still do right now because i'm talking about it, but if i had been writing about social security and actually at the same time, i was writing by book, if
to climate policy, energy efficiency gets you in the same direction. and as the senator said, that is something on which congress has demonstrated as recently as the last five or six years that it can come together, and i think it could do it again and in a more aggressive way to get advantage of the opportunities which we now know that we have. some states have already experienced it and by the way some of the regulars of electricity like california and new york have figured out how to make it attractive to energy providers, electricity providers to provide more efficiency to the ed vintage of the consumer by to reducing rates so there are many things we would be able to agree on and advance the cause of the carbonizing the economy. >> the diversity of fuel sources as well as efficiency travel parallel to the interest of the environmental policy in my judgment. >> we did, the congress did agree on the standards and the administration has continued to work in the industry to move those numbers up even more so there is a classic example of how we did something. >> i wondered i
. oel kline, get rid of the department of energy. one government, 100,000 kids in arizona will now have $5,000 voucher, public school or private school or home school. if they don't spend it -- you don't need more money. given the post office, your letters arrive sooner or would allow fedex or ups to deliver mail to make the post office mail different. >> we are really getting that. one more question. when you leave here very shortly, you go to a wednesday meeting, a liberal meeting of the right wing -- this is a weekly meeting you have had -- >> some of the people are from there. >> this is a weekly meeting of what you call a center-right coalition. you have several meetings, 60 of them around the country. this is a place where congress, people from think takes toward generally agree get together, 150 people, sometimes 20 of them will speak. what you going to tell them? what is your message? >> the reason people come to my meeting is i don't tell me things. if i talk, everybody gets -- 33 people attempt and we will overtime be candid. field kinks and activist groups, running the republ
at rice university. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal", gas prices and alternative energy efforts. long-term unemployment benefits and why they may end in january without congressional action is discussed. after that, dominic chu describes what wall street investors are doing with their money in excess of the fiscal cliff. close plus your e-mails and phone calls and tweets. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights, watch key public policy events, and every weekend, the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules on the website and join in the the conversation on social media sites. >> representatives met in nova scotia earlier this month before the house. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> welcome back, everybody. i would like to hand over to the dominical steve clemons, who is moderating the session. >> thank you so much. it's great to be with all of you. we have a fantasti
senators trent lott and byron dorgan will lead a discussion on u.s. energy policy. at the national press club. the leaders are currently co-chairs of the bipartisan policy center's energy project. topics will include development and domestic gas and oil production, energy security threats and environmental challenges. that would be like at 10 a.m. eastern again on our companion network c-span. at 11:30 a.m. majority whip dick durbin will talk about the so-called fiscal cliff and deficit reduction at the center for american progress. fiscal cliff, a combination of those expiring tax provisions and budget cuts that could take place the beginning of the new you. they include the bush-era tax cuts and sequestration. live coverage starts at 1130 eastern also on c-span. we are likely to about the fiscal cliff during the senate session today getting underway at 10 a.m. eastern, just over a half hour from now. after the gavel and majority leader reid will be recognized to speak and will likely outlined the schedule for the day which could include debate on defense programs and policy, and possib
for fair and it was unique and different. it gave them a coat he shin and energy not seen. but those who fought and roker were to have a lot of experience thinking they had a fortnight to live. when they came home to see institutional threats to their service it mustered an extraordinary amount of completion and focus to push back successfully. >>host: what was the marines role in the curia? >> the first forces comment not sent in but said does conventional combat troops to push back the advance. but they got their early. even though the marine corps had no orders they immediately started and these guys came. what this meant in the critical first battle they have their own naval aviation flying over head. the the ability to flyover to be rid the radar will list important. >> you mentioned political lobbying. how did that occur? >> after rover to all services reorganize. we don't have the war department were new department. >> of the start of the process but they did down one taye said kent weigh
his energies and good name to our effort -- for ratification of the treaty than senator bob dole, a lifelong advocate for disability rights. we need to pass this in a tribute to bob dole, for his life of service to the state of kansas and to the nation as well as his heroic efforts on behalf of the disabled in the united states senate. these people have come together to support ratification of the treaty because they know it's critical for those living with disabilities in the united states and around the world. thanks to the a.d.a. and similar larks the united states has been so successful in providing accessibility and protection of rights that our nation is already in full compliance with all terms of the treaty. before transmitting this treaty, the obama administration conducted an exhaust i have comparison of the treaty's requirements to current united states law. here's what they found: the united states does not need to pass any new laws or regulations in order to fully meet the terms of the treaty. the fact that we've already met our exceed the treaty' treaty's requiremen
this wholesale gas and oil revolution. we have a path to energy independence in america that is $200 billion deficit right now. it is the bridge to renewable energy, renewable energy will take a long time. if we can move to gas we get tremendous benefits in terms of cleaner energy on the way to renewable energy future. if we could get those things done, steve, this would be transformational for our economy but we have not been able to act on these things even though i said earlier there is wide bipartisan -- >> thank you. let me just try to poke holes in this. if we rollback time to just before the financial crisis you look at the u.s. deposition. douglas holtz-eakin was out there talking about that already. and john mccain and others have been but it is much worse today but if you look at the deck in a different way, look at private sector debt, the fact, forget government debt. before the financial crisis private-sector debt was 160% of gdp in the united states and despite averaging, back to 160% of gdp we are still in crisis mode, you had structural corruption between regulators and finan
, this is begin to stink after three days. the toll in energy is used -- huge. he was once marge you. is impossible to convene the smallest and most transitory of human groups without an attempt to -- improvising. culture grows in mysterious ways. its growth has nothing to do with reason. is it reasonable that all americans have to say what seems to be the trouble officer. where is it written? they have to say hi, we can't come to the phone right now. leave your name and number. where in the world of these forms prescribed? a culture extemporizes itself and observances and response to communal necessity to deal with which it also extemporizes. these myths no less than political deals are most organizations can derive only from a limited return number of human problems and solutions. the left discovery of global warming, the sinfulness of man causing the seas to rise may also be found in genesis six. and consider the taking of snapshots before they're shutters clicked. the photographer says one, two, three. well, here's why. photography, exposure could last up to three minutes. so the
deal of energy or strategy to how to mobilize obama's army from 2008. it was quite a crowd r -- crowd, and it was muscular and ready, sort of where do we go? you look at the 2 # million people leaping and cheering in the mall in 8 degrees. they were looking for direction for the model. we see that everywhere. of course, what's interesting is you see that cropping up in the summer, in the middle of health care, the tea party rises from the loins so to speak from the republican party, ahijacked that debate. the administration lost control of it, wrestle it back after scott brown and after they lost their majority in january the following year, but then, of course, occupy wall street adds welcoming up -- as well coming up. obama keeps them at arms' length for the most part. i think the thinking, and i hear this from progressive activists over the last few days is a bit of a -- what's that line, lbj, you know, says to various leaders of his day, make me do it. you know, -- marlin -- martin luther king and others, make me do it. people are getting a system that obama and the signaling syst
not apply a great deal of energy or strategy to how to mobilize obama's army from 2008. it was quite a crowd and it was muscular and it was ready, sort of like where do we go. you look at those 2 million people. they're looking for direction for a more participatory model. we see that everywhere. it's interesting to see see that cropping up in the summer when in the middle of health care, the tea party rise out of loins to the public and party and it really hijacks the debate during the summer and the administration loses control. the vessel it back after scott brown unless their majority in january the following year. you can't occupy wall street is so coming up out of the white firmament of america and the fall of 2011. obama keeps them in arms length for the most part and i think thinking, and i hear this a lot from progressive that this over the last few weeks and certainly the last few days is with that line, lbj, you know, says taveras leaders of this day, make me do it. martin luther king and others. make they did the right thing. people are starting to get a sense that obama had this
in their community in a positive way, what happened was they were able to refocus a lot of that mental energy not on the past but on the future. and as they started to do that, they found ways to process what had happened. and we see the manifestation of some of the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder actually go down over time. i think the third and final thing we need to do for young men and women who have come home are facing this is to let them know that this is normal. it is an absolutely normal thing to have an abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation. a situation of extraordinary and violent and difficult and hardship, and is normal to come back and do not want is somebody stand behind you, do not want to be sitting at a restaurant in the middle of lots of people. that's a normal reaction to one of the things we have to do when people come back is to make sure that they now they, this is a normal and natural place, and let them know that there are many people who have been able and found ways to work through this. so we have to give them hope by letting them know this is norma
what we have achieved. when they have doubts about this let me quote the labor shout out energy minister, it means the most expensive deals would have to go being able to reduce the number of people to help get a clearer picture of what is happening and that could only be a good thing. that is the endorsement that i welcome. >> ed miller band. >> the governor promised there should be no rationing on grounds of cost alone. can the prime minister tell us whether he has kept that promise? >> the promise we have kept is that we would increase spending every year under this government and in britain, in england that is happening, in wales there's a massive cuts run by a neighbor. >> mr. speaker, several thousand fewer nurses with the public supporting and a very specific question about a promise by the secretary, the leader of the house, promise a year ago he promised a year ago that there will be no rationing. this is what the president of the world college of ophthalmologists recently said. he said this. pcs are not falling government guidelines. there restricting access to catarac
know, meditation, energy work. in prison there's almost no medical care, dental care, things like that, for people on death row. they're not going to put a lot of time and energy and effort into taking care of someone that they plan on killing. so i started suffering a lot of health problems over the years. it started getting worse and worse, and the only thing i had to help me through that was the medication techniques -- meditation techniques and the energy work, things of that nature. that was what helped me make it through. it also kept me focused in the present moment. you have a lot of people in prison the reason they go crazy is because they're always looking towards some day in the future when they're going to be out, and that's what they're living for. it's like today doesn't matter. i'm always looking at some date five years down the road, ten years down the road, a day that may not even exist. but doing that routine, doing that work it kept me focused in the present moment which probably saved by sanity. >> do you think conceivably you could have lived out your days in that
, energy, public safety, government performance, elections, broadband wired and wireless is transforming everything. it's already a game changer, and we're still in the early innings of this new communication technology. now, these opportunities, where we are in the curve of the technology and the opportunities, this is known around the world. when i meet with my international counterparts in every region of the world, they are focused on the opportunities of broadband. each of our global competitors wants to become a 21st century hub for broadband related innovation. and in today's flat the global economy where capital can float anywhere and innovation can work anywhere, we have to acknowledge that u.s. leadership going forward is not a given. it's something that we have to earn a new every day. and u.s. broadband leadership is particularly vital as developing countries grow and to middle-class expands around the world. these are good developments, but we should embrace them as the spur to our global competitiveness to ensure that we have in the u.s. world leading broadband infrastructu
, energy workers and it is medical care, dental care, things like that on death row. putting the energy and to someone they plan on killing. so i started suffering a lot of health problems over the years getting worse and worse and the only thing i had to help me through that is the meditation techniques, things of that nature. that is what helped me to make it through and it also kept me focus on the present moment. you have a lot of people in prison that go crazy because they are always looking towards someday in the future when they are going to be out. that is what they are living for. it's like today doesn't matter. i'm always looking at someday five years down the road, ten years down the road, a year that may not even exist. but doing it routine, it kept me focused in the present moment, which probably saved my sanity. >> do you think you could have lived out your days in that prison if you had to and have some relative measure of, you know, to use the real world happy life? >> i think i would have lived for maybe a year at the most or launder. i we 60 pounds today more than i di
is they were able to refocus a lot of their mental energy on the past but on the future. as they started to do that, they found ways to process what had happened. and we saw a manifestation of some of the symptoms go down over time. i think the third and final thing that we need to do is to let men and women know that this is normal. it is a normal thing to have an abnormal reaction to an abnormal situation. in a situation of difficulty and violence, it is hard to come back and not want to have someone stand behind you and sit in a restaurant in the middle of things. one of the things we have to do is make sure that people know they are in a normal and natural place and let them know that there are many people who have been able to and found ways to work through them. we have to help them know that this is normal and that people have done this successfully. if we can do all of that, keep people connected, let them know there is a sense of purpose and they are all right where they are at, then we find that a lot of people, even those with extreme cases, they can beat the condition and lead fulf
his whole energy on behalf of the union. as late as february 1861, in the middle of the crisis of the union, lincoln professed that during my whole political life i have revered clay as a teacher and leader. he also noted clay's opposition to slavery. several times we can make clear to point to his detestation of slavery. lincoln didn't invent anti-slavery. he downplayed his ability to moderate that stance. he did detest the institution. he even did so unsuccessfully to get his state to adopt gradual emancipation. he also said that he would never force lavery word had not previously existed. yet in 1850, clay declared that if the citizens they are placed slavery in their constitutions, he would honor their choice, and he did back the compromise of 1850, which gave the possibility of slavery in the new mexico and utah territories. the clay, no other moral issue match the importance for maintenance of the union. lincoln also spoke about compromise. publicly stood for the compromise in 1850. he announced that i, too, go for saving the union. much as i hate slavery, he said, i woul
, continue to encourage any energy independence. a resolution of the supply of unsold houses should be sought, but all of this will occur only if a reelected barack obama can somehow find the unique temperament required to work with his administration to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with a congress willing to pass legislation this country so desperately needs. although it is not a subject of this paper, one can ask, will he be reelected? historically, rarely have presidents been reelected to a second term with popularity ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests. but so does romney. it is interesting to note that only three of 19 presidents elected to a second term had relatively less popularity ratings at the time of their re-election -- had relatively low popularity ratings at the time of their re-election. these were woodrow wilson, harry truman and george w. bush. these presidents experienced troubled or failed second terms. history aside, one cannot discount the possibility that obama would win not based on statistics like this, but becau
markets would go down, planes would fall out of the sky from the energy sector would fail. there would be a global catastrophe. the point of this is to show how dependent we are as a society on this kind of open source collaborative labor. the fact that here's the thing that would've sounded like a utopian utopian fantasy 25 or 30 years ago. now, we are hooked on it as a progressive society. whether it is the private sector or the public sector. all of us now depend upon the product of that pure network collaboration. you know, when i look at how much we build and upload of collaboration, that is the thing that makes me say, what more can we do? what can we saw with this peer networking approach? >> host: the next call comes from alta dena, california. paco hello? we are going to have to put you on hold. you need to turn down the volume on your tv. we have bob in florida. >> caller: this is a great show and i appreciate that show in the guest as well. i am working on something and i am listening to you guys at the same time. i believe there are at least a handful of us who certainly ap
and everybody. that is when we see the web innovation mall, when we see the creativity, the energy of everybody start to come to bear on the biggest industries in the world. this is the maker movement. there are many definitions of the maker movement. i think the credit for the term goes to dale dougherty who works for o'reilly of o'reilly publishing company. around 2005-2016 recognized there was something going on, he saw web generation starting to use their hands more and work together in communities and share ideas a little more. digital tools -- he created a magazine for the movement. baker affairs which are hugely successful, 100,000 people come over the weekend, there was one in new york a couple weekends ago. the maker of movement was something they identified first, leading edge tech publishers, so not incidental that they spotted this was technologically driven ball so -- i hope tim o'reilly will forgive me the roots are in the 60s kind of social change, power of the people. they have their roots in the country and recognize justice steve jobs it a cultural revolution under this as wel
in the act of rowling his army at cedar creek. green with age, a statute conveys sheridan's electric energy. lincoln and more secretary ever stand had thought of the 33 year-old sheridan too young when grant proposed in july 1864 that he command the new army of the shenandoah. sheridan's size contributed to the impression of youth that he projected. he was just 5'5" and only 115 pounds in 1864. but as grant memorably replied to one officer commented on sheridan's diminutive stature, i think you'll find him plenty big enough for the job. just before sheridan's appointment, confederate general early and 14,000 troops have marched down the shenandoah valley, across the potomac at threatened washington, the tremendous shock, the capital was thrown into a panic, grant rushed troops to the city from his army outside petersburg, and early withdrew. to prevent a recurrence, the lincoln administration merged for military departments into a new one, with sheridan in charge of it. he was ordered to pursue jubal early's army to the death, and to destroy the shenandoah valley's grains, produce and lives
manufacturing tools to anybody and everybody. that is when we start to see the creativity and the energy of everybody starting to come to their is some of the biggest industries in the world. this is the major movement. there are many definitions and i just want to give you a little technology about it. the credit goes to jail dorsey who works for o'reilly. a big publishing company. around 2005 or 2006, he recognized that there was something going on. the web generation was starting to use their hands more. he created makers magazine, it was hugely successful, they do more than 100,000 people that go to these fairs every weekend. and i think it is the maker movement which is something identify with birds. they spotted that this was technology driven. so the roots are a little bit in the 60s, social change, power to the people, not san francisco, but the roots in the country. i think that they recognize that there was a cultural revolution under this as well. it was a combination of digital technology and new tools allowing people to do extraordinary things. and the recognition that peopl
of the networks is he just announced the tax tomorrow and not have broken his word on the energy tax rate in the middle class they could raise income taxes on people a year from now which is why what he wanted to do is kick out the tax rates for people that are less than 250 for a year. he can't get -- and this is where you talk about the dual mandate. we are talking about marginal tax rates on higher income people and successful small businesses. that raises 400 billion on the taxes in addition to the rate increases that he wants to include. another 400 billion over a decade. as we have over 800 billion that he plans to raise for the higher income people if he gets that tax hike he raises 8 trillion in debt over the next decade. so how we solve less than 10% of the problem. he then comes back and says who is going to pay the 8 trillion. that's the energy tax which of course. people have been trying to subpoena this information they don't want to share with anyone because it's relevant. carbon atom carbon copies when they send these e-mails. no, they are planning on the energy tax to turn
may be in the audience today but that energy and talent and brains around energizing and dingy nearing a community capability to lift people is what we have going on in the city and why this room is full. >> i ask the development question because i feel compelled to ask a news oriented question. i don't know why. [talking over each other] >> the biggest development on the horizon for boston is the possibility of a $1 billion casino complex built in east boston if the developers win the eastern massachusetts casino license, one of three licenses up for grabs from east to west in the state. the gaming commission has to go through its process but most insiders you talked to think the east boston plan has the best chance of any to go all the way and i am wondering, let me start with you, edward glaeser and then go to ayanna pressley. i am wondering if this panel thinks that project, if built, will prove to be a triumph of the city? >> i am relatively agnostic, i don't think gambling is a great sin and not a terrible thing but on the other hand it is unlikely to meet any sort of wellspring
everybody had a terrific thanksgiving. i know that we're just getting back and, so the energy level is probably going to be, mellow, which we'll make that work for us, since we're going to talk about what sometimes is contentious subject. today's panel is on the question of for-profits and federal education policy. this is a topic that we ad aei have been interested in and talking about for an extended stretch. the last couple of years with the generous support of the templeton foundation we have been running the private enterprise and american education project trying to think about both the opportunities and the challenges, the upsides and the downsides of having for-profits involved in k-12 and higher education. how do we make this work for kids and communities how do we think about some of the challenges and, potential perils of having for-profits involved. this panel is the close of a series of panels and conversations. we have commissioned a number about of pieces of new research which will be coming out as a book this spring with futures college press at columbia university.
to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichment facility find that iran continues to expand enrichment pass the iranian patrician capacity. 20% levels which is closer to the 90% for weapons grades and iran continues to refuse to address the iaea's questions about the potential military dimensions of its nuclear program. and it continues to resist tougher international inspections known as the iaea additional protocol. so we believe that there is time and clearly there's an interest from all parties to reach a diplomatic solution. and after several rounds of negotiations between the p5+1, and iran, it looks as though there will be a new round of talks in the next month, but perhaps early in 2011. it's also clear that the two sides have put forward specific concrete proposal, but those proposals have some different ideas come particularly about the sequencing of the steps necessary to assure the international community that iran's program is peaceful and from ever
washington could probably learn from. you know, we -- our energy policy. we fix problems, we don't complain about elle. and really everyone started coming around, that's right, we need to start doing that. so we came out of there unified. we had a one-pager of how we could address our immigration problem, 50,000-foot level, but it's one page. and we went to the floor of the convention. it's the largest gathering of conservatives in the nation. there's 8,000 delegates that are at this convention. 3,000 guests -- 2,000 guests and media all in all. i'm sure walking in to the floor, all of a sudden i see no amnesty stickers, i see a lot of campaign, oh, we're going to be having a nice debatement little did i know, it was on. and they called us every name in the book, they did everything. but when we went to the floor, we had the minutemen militia testify for us, hispanic -- people really felt a part of the therapeutic dr. phil session that we had in the subcommittee. but five times, four or five times they attacked our platform. not a portion of the platform, specifically our one-pager. five ti
. but i hope we can marshal the energy and create -- i think there's an extraordinary opportunity. i think we can turn that longevity paired docs into a fast payoff and i think the analogy is the movement of so many women into new roles in the 60's and 70's. at that point we were thinking as a society, this is going to be a zero-sum proposition. how we accommodate all this talent. we will simply displace men and end up at the same place that we started only with a lot of conflict along the way. now we know we would be never be competitive without that enormous source of talent. down the road we will feel the same way about the segment of population. i think there'll be lots of surprises as well. we can't write off the talent and experience of this group but even more we tend to underestimate the creativity and and -- david gallas and he studied creativity said creativity across the life course. he said the value of every significant painting that was sold over the last 100 years and as they looks at the patterns of this artwork more strongly than anything else was that the most valuable wo
that are important for queer communities -- the energy that we are putting around marriage equality issue. >> this is an important question. issues of employment discrimination are critically important. even things like health care disparity, if you will, the reality of where lbgt people are, it is not quite clear and it doesn't bubble up to what is being talked about right now. because marriage equality had been at the forefront. and i do think in some ways, it is why the national gays and lesbians have spent so much time trying to broaden this to make sure that transgendered people in those issues are included in all the work that we do. it is widely thought very hard to make sure that gender identity is included in the employment nondiscrimination act. because we could go the other way with incremental progress with his progress. but we would've left out a whole swath of the community. folks who have greater experiences of discrimination, violence is still an issue. we forget that people are still being violently attacked because of who they are and because of who they love. i think a
today, but that energy, that tall element, that -- talent, that brains around energizing and engineering a community's capability to lift people. that's what we've got going on in this city. that's why this room is full. >> absolutely. >> i ask the development question because i feel compelled to ask a news-oriented question, i don't know why. [laughter] >> bob, can i say one thing? >> i'll get you weighing in in a second. the biggest development on the horizon for boston is the possibility of a billion dollar casino complex being built in east boston at the suffolk downs race track if the developers, when the eastern massachusetts casino license -- one of the three up for grabs from east to west in the state -- the new state gaming commission, of course, has to go through its process, but most insiders you talk to think that the east boston plan has the best chance of any to go all the way. and i'm wondering, and, ed, let me start with you here, and then i want to go to ayanna. i'm wondering if this panel thinks if that project, if built, will prove to be a triumph of the city? >> i, i'
engel is a member of the energy and commerce committee and recently wrote a letter to fred upton, the chairman of the commerce committee, hoping to hold hearings on telecommunications and sandy. representative engel, what's your goal with those hearings? >> guest: well, you know, my district, as most districts in the new york, were disrupted by hurricane sandy. and when we look at the disruption, it's clear that telecommunications services were one of the key services that failed to perform. and so, um, we want to have a hearing just to find out what went wrong and what we can do to insure in the future that the same thing doesn't happen again. the fcc reported that the storm knocked out a quarter of the cell towers in an area spreading across ten states, and people lost wireless, it's, -- television, telephone and internet services. and, obviously, it puts lives at risk, and it's clear there either wasn't correct preparation, or we were caught by surprise. so this is not something that we want to happen again. the purpose of this hearing would not be to point any fingers, it wou
they are hungry, ambitious, educating their kids coming and we cannot just refocus and marshall the energy and the priorities of our country to get ahead of it. so, we brought a speaker tonight who is extraordinarily influential and a true inspiration on this issue in an. there is a quotation that when it comes to the future there are three types of people. there's those that let it happen, those that make it happen and those that wonder what happened. our speaker tonight is kevin chavous and he makes it happen. he is a businessman, he is an attorney, he's a bit of an entrepreneur but that makes some remarkable. what makes an extraordinary is that he's a true leader. he was on the d.c. city council and helped start the felker program. he wrote a book called voices of determination which is in the back and encourage dewaal to check it out and it is a testament to how kids can be an example to adults and overcome great odds and a true inspiration for why this issue is so important and why we need to invest and read on this issue. he's also a founding member for our children and he advises go
kyl. then on c-span, a forum on energy policy hosted by the bipartisan policy center. former senators and byron dorgan. that is at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> on 16 of 17 bases in the united states we have military-run schools. the average cost to educate a child in that school per year is $50,000. almost four times what the rest of public education costs. and the vast majority of our bases use public schools. we could take the money we're spending today, pay every public school system 14,000 per child and save billions of dollars per year and with the same or better outcomes. >> this weekend, you can talk with oklahoma senator about the fiscal clef, affordable care act to amend the future of the republican party on book tv. the senator has written several books and reports, including his latest, the debt bomb. join our three our conversation with calls, e-mails, tweet, and facebook comments. live sunday at noon eastern on book tv in depth on c-span2. >> there has been speculation in washington about whether or not the senate would change its rules regarding the filibuster when congress re
papers, vigor. the document energy, dispatch, secrecy, someone who could respond to a crisis at the time when there is a crisis, the constitution -- the articles of the federation meant there was a lot of debate, but nobody really to take charge. so they knew they knew they needed both, but they were also very concerned that the separation of power. a think it's fair to say that in the course of the 225 years since then, since that kind of invented or perhaps improvised the presidency is a better word, that there is the nature mentis change in the office. obviously, every president from washington on has taken certain powers for himself. sometimes congress has resisted. the pendulum has swung back and forth if we could go down the list. executive order, signing statements, the war powers. all of these things were fought far beyond what most of the founders would have been vision. but that is the way that democracy and the republic had evolved over these 225 years. >> host: kenneth davis, in your career, have you ever been a teacher at all? >> guest: no, i haven't. somebody called the pro
think we have to become more smarter and efficient with the resources. whether money, energy, time, motion associated with every single component of the educational institution. given the reality, every single component of the educational institution has to be evaluated based on what the return on investment of educational dollars including football. okay. so how do you do that? the way you do that is we have to go to the justification we have been using as been century. you have primary justification laws. part of it was to socialize in immigrant work force. the other major part of it is the great industrialist turn of the century were interested in football as a way to train work force for the industrial economy. they weren't folks who were physically fit. took direction, were obedient, there wasn't much room for lot ofy thinking on ate semibelie line. okay is it primary justification -- we no long -- [inaudible] okay. the other justification that we have used for years and i do believe this justification is that football is a way -- it's an educational tool bilged character. jus
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